Disturbing evidence suggests that WiFi radiation could increase the risk of miscarriages by almost 50%

Modern society is drunk on technology. It surrounds us everywhere we go, from the computers, tablets and laptops we use for work, to the “smart” phones we carry around and the movies we stream via WiFi. For many of us, it would be difficult to picture making it through 24 hours without using some form of wireless technology. While these devices provide amazing convenience and connectivity, however, they should have big, fat warning labels on them, because the EMF (electromagnetic frequency) radiation they transmit has been recognized as a class 2B possible carcinogen (cancer causer) by the World Health Organization, and more and more studies have proved conclusively that these devices cause serious health problems.

Of course, children are even more vulnerable to the effects of this type of radiation than adults, and unborn children are the most vulnerable of all.

A study conducted by researchers from the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research which was published in the journal Scientific Reports, found that when pregnant women are exposed to non-ionizing radiation from magnetic fields, such as that emitted by power lines, transformers, wireless devices and wireless networks, their risk of miscarriage increases by a staggering 48 percent. (Related: Radiation from wi-fi and cell phones increases pregnant women’s risk of miscarriage by nearly 50%.)

Troubling results

For their study, the Kaiser Permanente researchers monitored the exposure of 913 pregnant participants to non-ionizing radiation as well as the outcomes of their pregnancies when compared to the 10 to 15 percent rate of miscarriage which normally affects pregnant women. Science Daily reported:

Researchers asked women over age 18 with confirmed pregnancies to wear a small (a bit larger than a deck of cards) magnetic-field monitoring device for 24 hours. Participants also kept a diary of their activities on that day, and were interviewed in person to better control for possible confounding factors, as well as how typical their activities were on the monitoring day. Researchers controlled for multiple variables known to influence the risk of miscarriage, including nausea/vomiting, past history of miscarriage, alcohol use, caffeine intake, and maternal fever and infections. …

Miscarriage occurred in 10.4 percent of the women with the lowest measured exposure level (1st quartile) of magnetic field non-ionizing radiation on a typical day, and in 24.2 percent of the women with the higher measured exposure level (2nd, 3rd and 4th quartiles), a nearly three times higher relative risk.

Dr. De-Kun Li, M.D., Ph.D., lead investigator of the study and a reproductive and perinatal epidemiologist, noted that the results of this research prove that this type of radiation could pose serious threats to human health.

How pregnant women can minimize risk

Pregnant women who read this will be understandably concerned about minimizing their exposure to EMFs.

One suggestion is for moms-to-be to keep cellular devices as far away as possible from their bellies and to avoid carrying them close to their bodies, for example in their pockets.

Another good idea is to use a hands-free headset whenever possible and to keep smart wireless devices on airplane mode whenever they are not actively in use. It is important to try to minimize the amount of time spent talking on these devices and to opt to use an old-fashioned landline telephone whenever possible.

A final suggestion is to turn all your devices and routers off at night, since this is the time when your body repairs DNA damage.


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