Deaths During Opioid-Related Hospital Stays in U.S. Quadrupled

Heroin and other opioids are ravaging communities across America. Deaths from heroin increased 328% between 2010 and 2015, and drug deaths from fentanyl and other synthetic opioids are now seeing a sharp rise as well. More Americans die from drug overdoses than in car crashes, and this increasing trend is driven by Rx painkillers.

A new study released earlier this week confirms that deaths in opioid-related hospital stays in the U.S. have quadrupled between 1993 and 2014, PBS NewsHour reports.

Zirui Song, an assistant professor of health care policy at Harvard Medical School and a physician at Massachusetts General Hospital, launched the study in 2016 in an effort to gain a better understanding of the patients he treated.

Dr. Song analyzed nearly 385,000 hospital stays involving patients who were admitted for opioid use with data from the National Inpatient Sample of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, a national database compiled by the Agency for Healthcare Research Quality.

His research confirmed that by 2014, four times as many patients died from opioid-related causes while staying in the hospital, rising from 0.43 percent before 2000 to 2.02 percent.

Over the same time period, the study also found that patients admitted to the hospital for opioid use skewed younger — the average age was 39 years old — and were more likely to be Caucasian. The number of black and Hispanic patients admitted to hospitals for opioid or heroin use remained relatively stable.

Dr. Song said his study is intended to raise awareness for the need for better strategies for hospitals when patients are admitted for using opioids, in addition to continuing and improving public health.

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Doctors need to STOP prescribing Opiates and, those who do, need to properly detox their patients so they don’t have to go to Heroin!  Talk to your doctor about this today.


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Are You an Addict? Signs of a Prescription Drug Addiction

You just may not know you’re addicted when your drug dealer is your doctor.

Woman is suddenly stricken with sadness

When you’re sick or have suffered from a serious injury, the first few days after a visit to the doctor you rely heavily on the prescribed drug to ease the pain and get you through the day. However, you may reach a point where you feel compelled to continue taking the prescription long after you need it. If you think you or a loved one might have a problem with prescription drugs, there are some red flags you should watch out for.

The Cheat Sheet spoke with some of the country’s top addiction experts to learn more about prescription drug abuse.

There is sudden behavior change

One of the first signs of a prescription drug addiction is an abrupt change in behavior. If you suspect the abuse of prescription medication, take note of unusual behavior you hadn’t observed before.

Psychologist Matthew Polacheck, director of outpatient services at the Betty Ford Center in West Los Angeles, said behavioral changes may also be accompanied by cognitive and physical changes. “The first thing we look for is a change in behavior of any kind. [Someone] who never naps comes home and goes to sleep. [Someone] who is passive suddenly becomes more euphoric. More specific behavior includes nodding off, drowsiness, slurred speech, confused thinking, and pupils can also be constricted.”

The drug becomes part of a daily routine

Medications on shelves of medicine cabinet

If you or someone you know can’t seem to go a day without a prescription drug that was meant for short-term use, this is another red flag. Over time, short-term medication should be slowly tapered down until there is no longer a need for it.

Audrey Hope, an addictions specialist at Seasons in Malibu World Class Addiction Treatment, said if there is difficulty in stopping a drug, this should be a cause for concern. “The main sign that you are a prescription drug addict is that you use the drugs every day. You can’t function without them. You rely on them. You need them. You lie to yourself that it is for the ‘pain’ and because ‘the doctor prescribed it.’ You say it is OK to use them,” said Hope.

More of the drug is used than prescribed

Doctor handing pills to a patient

Another sign of trouble is using too much of the prescription and running out of the drug much earlier than expected considering the prescribed amount. Someone desperate for a refill may resort to manipulative behavior to obtain the drug, said Plattor. “Other signs of prescription addiction can include manipulative behaviors such as lying, stealing, using more of the drug than is prescribed, poor decision-making, ‘losing’ prescriptions often, and obtaining a number of prescriptions for the same drug(s) from more than one doctor,” Plattor said.

Misconceptions about prescription drug addiction

man pouring pills into his hand

There are many misunderstandings when it comes to an addiction to prescription drugs. Here are some of the most common ones.

Myth: Pain pills are the only addictive prescription drugs

Pink pills

While pain medications are commonly abused, there are many others that can become addictive. “In addiction treatment, what we see most is opioid abuse. We also see abuse of ADHD medications, such as Adderall or Ritalin. Medications like benzodiazepines can also be substances of abuse. Drugs given for anxiety or depression, especially when given without concurrent psychotherapy, can lead to substance abuse problems,” said Dr. Constance Scharff, the research director of addiction treatment center Cliffside Malibu and author of Ending Addiction for Good.

Myth: I trust my doctor so I don’t need to ask questions

Doctor looking at tablet

Ask questions about your prescription, and don’t just blindly trust your doctor. It’s important to check with your doctor and make sure you understand side effects as well as how much medicine you should take and when to stop. You should also let your physician know if you’re having a hard time stopping your medicine.

Where to get help

Psychologist making notes

If you’re looking for assistance for yourself or a loved one, know there is quality help out there. You can reach out to a support group or consider seeking the services of an inpatient or outpatient detox program. You can start your search online on websites such as VictoryRetreatMontana.com. 

 

For Article Source with edits: Click Here.

Opioid Crisis Spurs Change at Medical Schools

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Medical schools are responding to the nationwide opioid epidemic by changing the way they train future doctors.

Over the past 15 years, many U.S. medical schools have begun offering lessons, courses and clinical rotations in drug addiction treatment and pain management, experts say, and some schools have added these topics to their required curriculum.

Faculty at schools that require all students to learn about addiction and pain say their goal is to ensure that graduates understand the differences between situations where an opioid prescription is an appropriate treatment for a pain condition and when it isn’t the best option.

Recent medical school graduates who received this training say it has helped them make decisions about whether to prescribe an opioid drug.

“I felt more comfortable and confident in myself, knowing not only when to say no but also when to say yes,” says Dr. Kevin O’Day, a 2016 graduate from the University of Massachusetts School of Medicine who is now an internal medicine resident at the university.

Regarding the lectures on addiction and pain he’s received as a student at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine, Nadir Bilici said via email, “It has been useful to understand the challenges that patients with drug addiction face beyond receiving clinical treatment; we have learned how various socio-politico-economic factors go into making and breaking communities of addiction.”

Experts say that it’s important for aspiring doctors to learn how to avoid either overprescribing or underprescribing opioid medications, since this comes up in most areas of medicine, including surgery and primary care.

“Nobody wants the patient to suffer because their pain was undermanaged,” says Dr. Karen Sibert, an anesthesiologist and associate clinical professor with the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California—Los Angeles.

Sibert says most medical schools have bolstered the amount of training they provide on opioid alternatives, including intravenous versions of non-narcotic pain medicines and medical procedures that numb portions of the body where pain is present.

 Experts say it’s critical for all aspiring doctors to learn how to safely manage the pain of patients who suffer from either chronic or acute pain. They say it’s also important for future physicians to understand that people with chronic pain often visit doctors without any obvious symptoms besides a declaration that they feel pain.

“They don’t look sick like someone with acute pain,” says Dr. Daniel Alford, professor of medicine at the Boston University School of Medicine. “When you have acute pain, your heart rate goes up, your blood pressure goes up, you look terrible, but with chronic pain, you can look like anyone else but you have this terrible chronic pain.”

Because there are not visible signs of chronic pain, Alford says, doctors are often skeptical of whether patients who claim to feel chronic pain are feeling pain at all.

Learning how to interview and counsel patients who express pain is a key skill to learn during medical school, experts say, and this can be cultivated through clinical simulations. Some of these simulations show students how to reject a request for an opioid prescription from someone who is misusing the drug.

 One key sign that a medical school provides solid training in pain and addiction medicine, according to experts, is if it offers the opportunity to listen to panels of patients who have suffered from either a pain condition or drug addiction. Another positive sign is if the school offers field trips to addiction treatment centers or addiction self-help group meetings, or if it has pain management specialists on its faculty.
Because of the prevalence of opioid misuse, experts emphasize that medical students need to learn how to recognize when a patient suffers from an opioid addiction, suppress opioid withdrawal symptoms and treat an opioid overdose. They say it’s not important whether a school’s lessons about pain and addiction medicine are taught in stand-alone courses as long as these topics are taught.

“I don’t really think you can look for a specific course,” says Dr. Melissa Fischer, associate dean for undergraduate medical education at the University of Massachusetts. “Just because somebody has a pain management course doesn’t mean they’re doing something better or differently than somebody that doesn’t have a course with that name.”

However, Fischer says it’s important to attend a medical school that addresses opioid addiction somewhere in its curriculum, because this kind of common addiction is a quickly progressing and frequently fatal.

“One of the issues with opioid misuse as a chronic disease is that most chronic diseases kill people slowly and silently, but opioid use disorder does not,” she says. “It kills people quickly and when they’re young.”

Dr. Mishka Terplan, associate director of addiction medicine and professor at the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, says the opioid crisis has led to vital reforms at medical schools. “The future of medicine is going to look very different in very good ways as a consequence of the tragedy that we’re living through,” he says.

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America Is DRUGGED OUT On Opioids, Alcohol And Prescription Medications… Is SANITY Long Lost?

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shocking scientific study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine finds that 38% of Americans were prescribed addictive opioid painkillers in 2015. In addition, 1 in 8 Americans are said to be active alcoholics. With millions more Americans on psychiatric drugs, antidepressants, statin drugs and chemotherapy, it’s no exaggeration to say that America is a drugged-out nation. (Click here for original study from Annals.org)

“It’s a zombie nation,” I explain in the video below. A whopping 5% of American adults are currently abusing prescription opioids and 1% of American adults are chemically addicted to opioids.

According to the CDC, opioid drugs are now killing 33,000 Americans. This is a war on America, all conducted in the name of Big Pharma profits and the mass chemical intoxication of the masses. (Read DangerousMedicine.com for more news.)

It’s no coincidence, either, that a mass drugged-out population loses its ability to reason, making it highly vulnerable to fake news from the lying mainstream media, which now seems determined to destroy reason, vilify rationality and overthrow the Republic.

Learn the truth about the mass fatalities caused by toxic drugs at PharmaDeathClock.com:

Watch my studio news video to learn more:

Sources include:

Opioids.news

http://annals.org/aim/article/2646632/prescription-opioid-use-misuse-use-disorders-u-s-adults-2015

Five types of American doctors who know nothing about nutrition and push chemical medicines to cover up symptoms of deeper-rooted health problems

Ever heard of the 250,000 cotton farmers in central India who took their own lives after being manipulated by promises made by Monsanto? Monsanto claimed to be able to put an end to famine and promised unheard of riches and crop prosperity if the farmers would switch from their conventional farming methods to the use of GM seeds. Many farmers had to borrow money to purchase these seeds, and after several failed harvests, they were left with no income and out of control debt. After going bankrupt from Monsanto’s Ponzi scheme the farmers fell into an endless cycle of depression, hopelessness and despair. It is also believed that, aside from the obvious issue of loss of income, the daily contact with the poisonous pesticides and herbicides also led to the depression these farmers suffered from. They believed the only way out was suicide, many even poisoning themselves with the same pesticides they used to spray on their failed crops.

Do you really believe that dementia and depression caused by consuming toxic pesticides are limited to occupational hazards? What U.S. medical doctors ever test their patient’s blood or urine for pesticides before “recommending” chemical-based prescription medicines to relieve symptoms of pesticide poisoning, heavy metal toxin overload and the resulting nutritional deficiencies?

According to the Alzheimer’s Association and a controlled study that was done at Emory University’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, elevated serum pesticide levels are directly correlated to increased risk of dementia. Currently, at least five million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease – the most common form of dementia and a progressive, fatal brain disease. Is this a coincidence? More and more American crops are being dosed with known carcinogens manufactured in laboratories by Monsanto, Dow, Dupont, Syngenta, Cargill and Bayer. Still, hundreds of thousands of U.S. doctors give zero nutritional advice to their patients who come to them suffering from the obvious symptoms, diseases and disorders caused by ingesting pesticides, including those toxins found in genetically modified corn, soy and canola. Go figure.

Are your body and brain suffering from consuming chemicals? Then why on earth would you listen to a doctor who pushes chemical-based medicines for a living?

Besides naturopathic doctors, there is hardly a doctor in America who carefully examines everything their patients eat, drink and put on their skin before “diagnosing” health problems. Can you lay a tarp over a volcano and hope to cap the molten lava? Would you put a band aid on your stomach if you ate rotten meat and were suffering from food poisoning? These chemical prescription meds simply don’t make sense.

If we, as Americans, are never educated about the dangers of health-altering chemicals found in conventional produce, GM crops and popular personal care products, why wouldn’t we believe that “doctor recommended” chemicals could solve our health problems?

Most Americans bodies are like a volcano about to erupt, showing all the signs of chemical consumption disorder. Will you solve your health problems by ending your chemical consumption, or will you exacerbate your health ills by continuing to eat, drink and inject more toxins? Who are your doctors and do they know anything at all about nutrition? You better check.

Five kinds of chemical pushing hucksters who know good and well prescription drugs make health matters worse

#1. Addiction psychiatrists – these are medical doctors who mainly prescribe SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) for people with addictions to alcohol, illegal drugs or other experimental prescription medications. Pharmacological “strategies” are used by psychiatrists to target individuals suffering from anxiety or attention deficit disorders due to substance abuse. Could anxiety and depression also stem from chemical-laced foods? Of course it can, but is there even one addiction psychiatrist in America who tests their patient’s blood or urine for poisoning from insecticides and herbicides? Instead of searching for the root cause, many addiction psychiatrists sling experimental, dangerous mind-altering drugs like Prozac, Zoloft and Paxil on tens of millions of Americans, including children and teens, because it’s easy money. Evidence continues to accumulate that these drugs induce suicidal and murderous actions, not to mention strokes for women after menopause.

#2. Pediatricians and adolescent medicine specialists – Ever heard of “Dollars for Docs?” Pharmaceutical and medical device companies are now required by law to release details of their payments to all kinds of U.S. doctors that push pills on infants, children and teens (over $6 billion every three years). Why are there no payments to doctors to promote organic foods and natural remedies?

#3. Oncologists (including radiation oncologists) – Did you know chemotherapy can backfire and cause healthy cells to feed the growth of cancer tumors? So why then do oncologists use chemo as a mainstream method of treating a cell disorder that’s mainly caused by the consumption of chemicals? It doesn’t make sense.

#4. Dermatologists – Most dermatologists perform surgery as a standard function for treating cancer “spots” on the skin, but cancer is a disorder of the cells, with a deeper-rooted cause. Would you go around your yard chopping off the tops of weeds and expecting them to stop growing? It doesn’t make sense.

#5. Surgeons – Should surgeons keep removing the malfunctioning organs of Americans who eat all the wrong foods daily? Is this cost effective and wise? Maybe every surgeon, radiologist, pediatrician and oncologist in America needs to go back to college and study nutrition, then reassess their fundamental approach to medicine.

Sources for this article include:
NaturalNews.com
TheBloggingHounds.com
SeattleOrganicRestaurants.com
BeyondPesticides.org
CDC.news
Projects.propublica.org

There’s Someone Missing in Bed

It’s really a menage de twa, as the only one missing in this telling cartoon is a doctor who needs to be there in bed with the FDA and the Drug Companies.  It’s times like these, I wish I could draw well and fix this up.  In any case, NEVER  trust the medical profession… that specifically includes your doctor!

A NEW Public Health Crisis: Preventable harm in healthcare

The National Patient Safety Foundation called for greater collaboration and nationwide adoption of a public health framework to help guide efforts to prevent patient harm.