Are You an Addict? Signs of a Prescription Drug Addiction

You just may not know you’re addicted when your drug dealer is your doctor.

Woman is suddenly stricken with sadness

When you’re sick or have suffered from a serious injury, the first few days after a visit to the doctor you rely heavily on the prescribed drug to ease the pain and get you through the day. However, you may reach a point where you feel compelled to continue taking the prescription long after you need it. If you think you or a loved one might have a problem with prescription drugs, there are some red flags you should watch out for.

The Cheat Sheet spoke with some of the country’s top addiction experts to learn more about prescription drug abuse.

There is sudden behavior change

One of the first signs of a prescription drug addiction is an abrupt change in behavior. If you suspect the abuse of prescription medication, take note of unusual behavior you hadn’t observed before.

Psychologist Matthew Polacheck, director of outpatient services at the Betty Ford Center in West Los Angeles, said behavioral changes may also be accompanied by cognitive and physical changes. “The first thing we look for is a change in behavior of any kind. [Someone] who never naps comes home and goes to sleep. [Someone] who is passive suddenly becomes more euphoric. More specific behavior includes nodding off, drowsiness, slurred speech, confused thinking, and pupils can also be constricted.”

The drug becomes part of a daily routine

Medications on shelves of medicine cabinet

If you or someone you know can’t seem to go a day without a prescription drug that was meant for short-term use, this is another red flag. Over time, short-term medication should be slowly tapered down until there is no longer a need for it.

Audrey Hope, an addictions specialist at Seasons in Malibu World Class Addiction Treatment, said if there is difficulty in stopping a drug, this should be a cause for concern. “The main sign that you are a prescription drug addict is that you use the drugs every day. You can’t function without them. You rely on them. You need them. You lie to yourself that it is for the ‘pain’ and because ‘the doctor prescribed it.’ You say it is OK to use them,” said Hope.

More of the drug is used than prescribed

Doctor handing pills to a patient

Another sign of trouble is using too much of the prescription and running out of the drug much earlier than expected considering the prescribed amount. Someone desperate for a refill may resort to manipulative behavior to obtain the drug, said Plattor. “Other signs of prescription addiction can include manipulative behaviors such as lying, stealing, using more of the drug than is prescribed, poor decision-making, ‘losing’ prescriptions often, and obtaining a number of prescriptions for the same drug(s) from more than one doctor,” Plattor said.

Misconceptions about prescription drug addiction

man pouring pills into his hand

There are many misunderstandings when it comes to an addiction to prescription drugs. Here are some of the most common ones.

Myth: Pain pills are the only addictive prescription drugs

Pink pills

While pain medications are commonly abused, there are many others that can become addictive. “In addiction treatment, what we see most is opioid abuse. We also see abuse of ADHD medications, such as Adderall or Ritalin. Medications like benzodiazepines can also be substances of abuse. Drugs given for anxiety or depression, especially when given without concurrent psychotherapy, can lead to substance abuse problems,” said Dr. Constance Scharff, the research director of addiction treatment center Cliffside Malibu and author of Ending Addiction for Good.

Myth: I trust my doctor so I don’t need to ask questions

Doctor looking at tablet

Ask questions about your prescription, and don’t just blindly trust your doctor. It’s important to check with your doctor and make sure you understand side effects as well as how much medicine you should take and when to stop. You should also let your physician know if you’re having a hard time stopping your medicine.

Where to get help

Psychologist making notes

If you’re looking for assistance for yourself or a loved one, know there is quality help out there. You can reach out to a support group or consider seeking the services of an inpatient or outpatient detox program. You can start your search online on websites such as VictoryRetreatMontana.com. 

 

For Article Source with edits: Click Here.

Lawmaker wants to legalize use of prescription painkillers for death sentences

maxresdefault

A state senator in Maryland is now calling for lethal injection to be reinstated in the state for certain crimes, and he wants to use the same drugs that are already killing thousands of Americans each year to get the job done: heroin and fentanyl.

Hartford Country Republican Senator Robert G. Cassilly would like to see lethal injection used for crimes such as serial murders, murders of witnesses or law enforcement officials, murders that take place during a sex offense or hate crime, and killing two or more people in a single incident.

He expressed his intention to ask the Maryland General Assembly to restore capital punishment during the legislative session next year; it was repealed in 2013 during the administration of Governor Martin O’Malley. The last execution in the state took place back in 1993.

His comments came just five days after a Maryland business park shooting saw three deaths and two injuries. The victims had been gunned down by a co-worker at the Advanced Granite Solutions office in Edgewood. The suspect then allegedly drove to Delaware, where he shot another individual. Radee Prince is being held on $2.1 million bond. He faces life in prison without parole for several first-degree murder charges.

Cassilly said: “There’s got to be a penalty that says, ‘Look, you’ve killed; now it can actually get a whole lot worse from this [if you re-offend] because we will hold your life over your head.”

He came up with the idea of using heroin and fentanyl in order to counter an argument commonly used by lethal injection opponents – that the process is painful.

“What we’ve seen is a mix of heroin and fentanyl obviously must not be too painful,” he said, “because we see people pumped up with [the antidote] Narcan on the verge of death, probably practically dead…they turn back around and they want to do [heroin and fentanyl] again.”

Senator Cassilly’s brother is State’s Attorney Joseph Cassilly, who believes that choosing these substances for lethal injections would also send a message to the population about just how deadly a combination it is and hopefully help deter people from taking these drugs and becoming yet another tragic statistic.

Opioids inhibit respiration by blocking the brain from signaling to the body to breathe; those who take higher doses of it essentially forget how to breathe. At 100 times stronger than heroin, just a few grains of fentanyl can kill somebody, and the growing trend of heroin laced with fentanyl has been a key driver of the opioid crisis in the U.S.

Nevada already planning a lethal injection with fentanyl

Last month, Nevada announced plans of its own to use fentanyl in lethal injections. Murderer Scott Raymond Dosier is set to be injected with fentanyl, Valium, and the muscle relaxant cisatracurium, which is related to curare. The injection will take place next month in what will be the state’s first execution in more than a decade.

States that have the death penalty have been having trouble sourcing drugs for executions in recent years, prompting them to turn to new combinations. Many pharmaceutical makers are opposed to having their drugs associated with executions due to concerns about their reputation – nevermind the fact that their drugs kill countless innocent people each year.

Sources include:

NaturalNews.com

Baltimore.CBSLocal.com

Patch.com

IBTimes.co.uk

TheDailyBeast.com


An final end to drug & alcohol recovery is as close as this website: VictoryRetreatMontana.com

America Is DRUGGED OUT On Opioids, Alcohol And Prescription Medications… Is SANITY Long Lost?

insane

shocking scientific study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine finds that 38% of Americans were prescribed addictive opioid painkillers in 2015. In addition, 1 in 8 Americans are said to be active alcoholics. With millions more Americans on psychiatric drugs, antidepressants, statin drugs and chemotherapy, it’s no exaggeration to say that America is a drugged-out nation. (Click here for original study from Annals.org)

“It’s a zombie nation,” I explain in the video below. A whopping 5% of American adults are currently abusing prescription opioids and 1% of American adults are chemically addicted to opioids.

According to the CDC, opioid drugs are now killing 33,000 Americans. This is a war on America, all conducted in the name of Big Pharma profits and the mass chemical intoxication of the masses. (Read DangerousMedicine.com for more news.)

It’s no coincidence, either, that a mass drugged-out population loses its ability to reason, making it highly vulnerable to fake news from the lying mainstream media, which now seems determined to destroy reason, vilify rationality and overthrow the Republic.

Learn the truth about the mass fatalities caused by toxic drugs at PharmaDeathClock.com:

Watch my studio news video to learn more:

Sources include:

Opioids.news

http://annals.org/aim/article/2646632/prescription-opioid-use-misuse-use-disorders-u-s-adults-2015

TODAY, THE FDA REQUESTED THAT OPANA ER BE REMOVED FROM THE MARKET DUE TO ADDICTION & DEATH. IT’S ABOUT TIME!!!!!!!!!!


Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration requested that Endo Pharmaceuticals remove its opioid pain medication, reformulated Opana ER (oxymorphone hydrochloride), from the market. After careful consideration, the agency is seeking removal based on its concern that the benefits of the drug may no longer outweigh its risks. This is the first time the agency has taken steps to remove a currently marketed opioid pain medication from sale due to the public health consequences of abuse.

The FDA’s decision is based on a review of all available postmarketing data, which demonstrated a significant shift in the route of abuse of Opana ER from nasal to injection following the product’s reformulation. Injection abuse of reformulated Opana ER has been associated with a serious outbreak of HIV and hepatitis C, as well as cases of a serious blood disorder (thrombotic microangiopathy). This decision follows a March 2017 FDA advisory committee meeting where a group of independent experts voted 18-8 that the benefits of reformulated Opana ER no longer outweigh its risks.

Opana ER was first approved in 2006 for the management of moderate-to-severe pain when a continuous, around-the-clock opioid analgesic is needed for an extended period of time. In 2012, Endo replaced the original formulation of Opana ER with a new formulation intended to make the drug resistant to physical and chemical manipulation for abuse by snorting or injecting. While the product met the regulatory standards for approval, the FDA determined that the data did not show that the reformulation could be expected to meaningfully reduce abuse and declined the company’s request to include labeling describing potentially abuse-deterrent properties for Opana ER. Now, with more information about the risks of the reformulated product, the agency is taking steps to remove the reformulated Opana ER from the market.

The FDA has requested that the company voluntarily remove reformulated Opana ER from the market. Should the company choose not to remove the product, the agency intends to take steps to formally require its removal by withdrawing approval. In the interim, the FDA is making health care professionals and others aware of the particularly serious risks associated with the abuse of this product.

The FDA will continue to examine the risk-benefit profile of all approved opioid analgesic products and take further actions as appropriate as a part of our response to this public health crisis.

For more information, please visit: Opana ER


.In the throes of a prescription drug addiction?  We can help.  CLICK HERE.  You can also contact us below.

 

Snorting Your Prescription Painkillers

Insufflation – better known as snorting – causes drugs to enter your bloodstream quickly, giving you a more intense and faster high. People with chronic pain or those who have a painkiller addiction, seek a way to chase the high they once had. As you may know, the euphoria leaves after a short while, which leaves your body with a desperate need for that high again. What people do is increase their dosage on their own in order to bring back the euphoria. Many even make the decision to crush up their tablets and snort them. They think that it’s the fastest way to reach that desired euphoria again.; however, it’s not.

If you think snorting is a behavior of street Rx drug users, think again.  There are all too many little grannies who are doing it due to the extreme and desperate need for the body to maintain a high.

Why is Snorting Drugs Bad?
Snorting painkillers is significantly more dangerous than taking them as a pill or tablet by mouth, and the decision to crush up your hydrocodone could very well cost you your life.

5 reasons why snorting painkillers could likely cause you to lose your life:

1. It’s Harder to Control the Dosage
The process of crushing and snorting painkillers makes it easier for the drugs to be absorbed into your blood stream. This, in turn, creates a faster and more unpredictable high. Though this might sound appealing when you’re craving a Vicodin (or other opiate) fix, you’ll have zero control over the end result.

Don’t wait
Get treatment before your prescription drug use becomes life-threatening. Let me tell you, it will.

Accidental overdoses are the leading cause of accidental injury deaths, and prescription painkillers are the most frequent source of the overdose. Every time you snort painkillers, you put your life at risk. One American dies every 19 minute for an accidental overdose.

2. Time is running out

Addiction begins with tolerance, which uncontrollably pushes you to use larger doses than you initially were given. At this desperate point, all to many begin to snort.
Once you become addicted to painkillers, quitting without medically supervised detox becomes impossible–and especially dangerous.

3. Respiratory and Sinus Irritation

Snorting these potent substances will cause your sinuses and respiratory system to become extremely irritated causing frequent illness and then, disease. If you’re not careful, you could even choke (to death) as you attempt to snort the drugs.

The damage ranges from mild to life-threatening, but some of the ways snorting painkillers can affect your breathing include:

  • Chronic sinus infections and congestion.
  • Changes in your voice.
  • Frequent nose bleeds.
  • Sleep apnea and snoring.
  • Awakening due to congestion at night.
  • Lung infections, pneumonia, and similar complications.
  • Sores in and around your nose and mouth.

Why not manage the damage today by getting help to get healthy again. As long as you can still breathe, t’s never too late.

4. Intensification of Other Risk Factors

The fact that snorting painkillers is dangerous doesn’t mean that taking pills by mouth is okay… even for people with a valid medical prescription. Signs that your life is headed to total darkness:

  • Depression
  • Difficulties with motivation.
  • Anxiety and Panic Attacks.
  • Trouble concentrating.
  • Sleeping too much… not enough.
  • Changes in appetite and taste.
  • Gastrointestinal distress, such as frequent unexplained vomiting.
  • Constipation / Diarrhea
  • Cardiovascular problems.
  • Increased vulnerability to infections.
  • High-risk behavior, such as doctor shopping and stealing drugs.
  • Difficulty relating to others.
  • Worsening of chronic pain due to the drugs diminishing your overall health.
  • Trouble staying awake during the day, and disruptions in sleep during the night.
  • Vivid goulish dreams.
  • Chronic Heartburn.
  • Palpitations.
  • Apathy.
  • Headache.
  • Severe Agitation
  • Hallucinations – both auditory and visual
  • Skin crawling
  • Having to take a lot of time off from work.
  • Disconnecting from family and friends who don’t use.

5. Unpredictable Effects

The effects of painkiller use are well-known when these drugs are administered orally. But because painkillers were never designed to be snorted, it’s hard to predict how snorting painkillers might affect you.

No matter how much you believe you are in control of your painkiller use, snorting these dangerous drugs robs you of control, and can yield deadly unanticipated side effects and death. These drugs can even place you in a vegetative state for the rest of your life.
Personal factors, such as your cardiovascular health and age, can alter the effects of the drugs.


VictoryRetreatMontana.com – An up and coming alternative method to healing addiction through God’s principles.